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Funding for Exhibit on African American Activism at NU

Sunday, August 1, 2004
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Archives and Special Collections Department
archives [at] neu.edu
(617) 373-2351
Department: 
Archives and Special Collections

Funding for Exhibit on African American Activism at NU

Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department and the Department of African-American Studies are pleased to announce the receipt of a grant from Northeastern's Office of Affirmative Action and Diversity to fund the creation of a permanent, online, multi-media exhibit concerning the history of African American activism on campus in the late 1960s through the 1970s. Michelle Light, Assistant Archivist, Robert L. Hall, Associate Professor of African American Studies and History, and Joan D. Krizack, University Archivist and Head, Special Collections Department, will collaborate on this project.

This exhibit will enhance the understanding of the evolution of diversity on Northeastern's campus and promote respect for the university's tradition of seeking social justice; it will tell the story of how African Americans achieved a more diverse and equitable academic and social environment; and it will highlight selected historical records that best document the many voices, concerns, and innovations of the Northeastern University community. The exhibit will include photographs, newspaper articles, correspondence, memoranda, video clips, and petitions relating to events and programs such as the 1968 black student protests and the founding of, the African-American Institute, The Onyx, and the Department of African-American Studies.

Northeastern currently lacks a written history of its quest for a more diverse campus; by compiling a history of the earliest attempts to achieve diversity on campus, accompanied by visual images and access to the primary sources, Northeastern can tell its story to the university, the local community, and the world beyond.

The exhibit will be modeled on other exhibits that the Archives has completed, for example, We Raise Our Voices and A Proud Past: Boston Bouvé College, 1913-1977. The goal is for all who view this exhibit to gain a better understanding of the history of the development of the university's mission for a diverse campus, and develop a greater respect for past and present efforts to achieve social justice.

When the exhibit is complete, the University Library plans to hold an event, both to introduce it to Northeastern students, faculty, staff and members of the local community, and to provide a forum for discussing issues surrounding the creation of a more inclusive society. The event will also promote the Archives' collections (over 40) relating to African American, Latino, and gay and lesbian social justice organizations in the Boston area. View a list of special collections available for research in the NU Archives and Special Collections Department.

Topic: 
Digital collections